Cycling Canada Announces 2019 National Championships Calendar

Cycling Canada is pleased to confirm the 2019 calendar for national championships across Road, Track, Mountain Bike, Para-Cycling, BMX and Cyclo-cross. The national championships represent the highest level of competition on the domestic calendar, with champions receiving the red and white maple leaf jersey, which they get to wear to compete around the world.
Canadian National Championships 2018
Photo by Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

“Cycling Canada is excited to release the preliminary dates and locations of the 2019 Canadian Championships,” said Mathieu Boucher, Performance Development Director at Cycling Canada. “We have the privilege to partner with an amazing group of organizers, public and corporate partners who are fully dedicated to hosting the best possible events to showcase our sport to the public and to support the development of our athletes across the country.”

The first national championships of 2019 will be the Canadian Track Championships for Under-17, Junior and Para cyclists, to be held at the Mattamy National Cycling Centre in Milton, Ontario, in April.

The Global Relay Canadian Road Championships will begin with the Masters categories, to take place in Victoria, B.C., on June 7-9, and will be organized by the Russ Hays Racing Cycling Society. The Elite, Junior and Para Global Relay Canadian Road Championships will return, after a few years absence, to the Quebec City region on June 27-30, organized by the Grand Prix Cycliste de Beauce. The specific location will be announced shortly.

In July, attention turns to BMX and Mountain Bike, with the BMX Canadian Championships scheduled for Toronto, ON, on July 6th.  Also taking place in 2019 will be the first-ever BMX Freestyle Canadian Championships, as this sport prepares for its Olympic debut in 2020. More details regarding the date and location of Canada’s first Freestyle BMX championships will be confirmed in the coming months. Mountain Bike will be split across four championships for the first time, beginning with the XCO MTB Canadian Championships at Hardwood Ski & Bike in Oro Station, ON, on July 20-21. A week later, the Downhill MTB Canadian Championships will take place at Panorama Mountain Resort in Invermere, BC, on July 27-28. The DH Championships will be joined by the new Enduro MTB Canadian Championships on July 26-27, creating a Gravity Championships Weekend. The Mountain Bike Championships will conclude on September 7-8 in St-Felicien, QC, with the XCM (Marathon) MTB Canadian Championships.

“We are thrilled to add the Canadian Enduro Championships to our calendar for the first time in 2019,” said Josh Peacock, Competition Coordinator at Cycling Canada. “In light of the recent announcement of the UCI to work with the Enduro World Series beginning 2019, we remain committed to work with organizations such as CNES to ensure the smoothest possible integration onto our national calendar.”

The final two championships of the year, to be held in the Fall, are the Canadian Track Championships for Elite and Masters categories at the Mattamy National Cycling Centre, in Milton, ON, and the Cyclo-cross Canadian Championships, which will return to Peterborough, ON, for a second year. Schedules for these events will be announced at a later date.

Canadian Track Championships (U17/Junior/Para)
Organizer: Cycling Canada
Milton, ON
April 2019

Global Relay Canadian Road Championships (Masters)
Organizer: Russ Hays Racing Cycling Society
Victoria, BC
June 7-9, 2019

Global Relay Canadian Road Championships (Elite/Para/Junior)
Organizer: Grand Prix Cycliste de Beauce
Location TBC
June 27-30, 2019

BMX Canadian Championships
Organizer: Cycling Canada
Toronto, ON
July 6, 2019

XCO MTB Canadian Championships
Organizer: Pulse Racing
Hardwood Ski & Bike, Oro Station, ON
July 20-21, 2019

Enduro MTB Canadian Championships
Organizer: Canadian National Enduro Series
Panorama Mountain Resort, Invermere, BC
July 26-27, 2019

Downhill MTB Canadian Championships
Organizer: Panorama Mountain Resort
Panorama Mountain Resort, Invermere, BC
July 27-28, 2019

XCM MTB Canadian Championships
Organizer: Compétition Vélo2Max
St-Félicien, QC
September 7-8, 2019

Cyclo-cross Canadian Championships
Organizer: Peterborough Cycling Club
Peterborough, ON
Date TBC (to be announced Fall 2018)

Canadian Track Championships (Elite/Masters)
Organizer: Cycling Canada
Milton, ON
Date TBC (to be announced Fall 2018)


Source: Cycling Canada
About Cycling Canada
Cycling Canada is the governing body for competitive cycling in Canada. Founded in 1882, Cycling Canada aims to create and sustain an effective system that develops talented Canadian cyclists to achieve Olympic, Paralympic, and World Championship medal performances. With the vision of being a leading competitive cycling nation by 2020 celebrating enhanced international success, increased national participation and world class event hosting, Cycling Canada manages the High Performance team, hosts national and international events and administers programs to promote and grow cycling across the country. Cycling Canada programs are made possible through the support of its valued corporate partners – Global Relay, Lexus Canada, Mattamy Homes, Louis Garneau, lululemon, 4iiii, Argon18 and Bear Mountain Resort – along with the Government of Canada, Own The Podium, the Canadian Olympic Committee and the Canadian Paralympic Committee.

 

 

 

BC Riders Find Success at 2018 Global Relay Canadian Road Championships

Riders from BC were no strangers to the podium at the 2018 Global Relay Canadian Road Championships in Saguenay, Quebec from June 21-24. The Junior Men from BC swept the podium in the Individual Time Trial as Ben Katerberg (TaG Cycling), Conor Martin (TaG Cycling), and Jacob Rubliak (Cycling BC) finished 1st, 2nd, and 3rd respectively.

 

Junior Men's poidum awards at the 2018 Global Relay Canadian Road Championships
Photo by: Rob Jones/CanadianCyclist

 

Rally Cycling’s Gillian Ellsay finished second place in the time trial while Svein Tuft (Michelton-Scott) defended his title as the Elite Men’s Time Trial champion.

 

Svein Tuft on a TT Time Trial bike. He looks fast.
Svein Tuft. Photo by: Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

 

Junior Rider Elizabeth Gin (Cycling BC) had a third place finish in the Junior Women’s Road Race while Ben Katerberg claimed the top spot for the Junior Men. Rally Cycling’s Sara Bergen and Nigel Ellsay both came in third place in their respective road races.

Junior Women's winners
Photo by: Rob Jones/CanadianCyclist

In the Junior Men’s Criterium, Riley Pickrell and Thomas Schellenberg from Cycling BC’s High Performance team placed 1st and 2nd respectively while Ben Katerberg nearly podiumed again with a 4th place finish. Sara Bergen reigned supreme as the Elite-U23 women’s champion and fellow Rally Cycling team member, Adam De Vos, came in 4th in the men’s race.

Sara Bergen riding her bike
Sara Bergen. Photo by: Rob Jones/CanadianCyclist

Overall, it was a stellar performance by our riders from BC. Congratulations to all our riders and we hope to see more BC riders competing for national championships in the future.

View all 2018 Canadian Road Championships results.

 

 

 

BC Riders at UCI BMX Supercross World Cup Opener

Canada’s BMX squad began their 2018 season on March 31st and April 1st with the first two rounds of the UCI BMX Supercross World Cup, which took place in Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France, less than an hour outside of Paris.

Drew Mechielsen of Langley, BC, was Canada’s top rider of the weekend, making the women’s final in Round 1 on Saturday, and finishing eighth overall. On Sunday in Round 2 she was 28th after crashing out of competition in the quarterfinals.

“After a tough off season full of training it felt so awesome to have it all pay off and make it into the final,” said Mechielsen.

The men did not fare as well, with neither Tory Nyhaug (Coquitlam, BC) or James Palmer (North Vancouver, BC) making it past the quarter-finals. Nyhaug did not race on Saturday after injuring his back in training, but was however able to compete on Sunday, finishing just out qualifying for the semi-finals, and ending up 19th overall. Palmer made it to the quarter-finals on both days, finishing 23rd on Saturday and 24th on Sunday.

“It was a tough weekend, after hurting my back Friday,” admitted Nyhaug. “We did everything we could to be able to race, but after trying to practice Saturday it was a no-go. Thanks to our support team, I was able to take the start on Sunday and did my best given the situation. We’ll head home for some more treatment and be ready for Papendal [Rounds 3 and 4].”

James Palmer was pleased to see improvements after working over the winter. “After a long off season spent working on different weaknesses and preparing for the year, it was great to finally kick off our World Cup season in France this past weekend! We put a lot of emphasis this off-season on bettering my starts and acceleration down the hill, so to come out and lay down some of my fastest and most consistent starts over a World Cup weekend was extremely gratifying. The progress I’ve made these past few months with the team have us heading in a great direction.”

Adam Muys, BMX Coach at Cycling Canada, said “Over this off-season we have spent a lot of time working on our starts and it was really good to see the riders’ hard work paying off in the races. Drew [Mechielsen] was flying out of the gate and battling down the first straight with the world’s best. She earned her spot in the women’s final.”


Source: Cycling Canada
About Cycling Canada
Cycling Canada is the governing body for competitive cycling in Canada. Founded in 1882, Cycling Canada aims to create and sustain an effective system that develops talented Canadian cyclists to achieve Olympic, Paralympic, and World Championship medal performances. With the vision of being a leading competitive cycling nation by 2020 celebrating enhanced international success, increased national participation and world class event hosting, Cycling Canada manages the High Performance team, hosts national and international events and administers programs to promote and grow cycling across the country. Cycling Canada programs are made possible through the support of its valued corporate partners – Global Relay, Lexus Canada, Mattamy Homes, Louis Garneau and Bear Mountain Resort – along with the Government of Canada, Own The Podium, the Canadian Olympic Committee and the Canadian Paralympic Committee.

Videos:

2018 UCI BMX Supercross World Cup – Women’s Round 2

 2018 UCI BMX Supercross World Cup – Men’s Round 2

Pendrel 7th at Opening of Mountain Bike World Cup

Catharine Pendrel of Kamloops, BC, was Canada’s top finisher at the opening round of the UCI Mercedes-Benz Mountain Bike World Cup in Stellenbosch, South Africa, on Saturday, finishing seventh in the Elite women’s competition.

 

Pendrel, a three-time World Cup overall champion and the 2016 Olympic bronze medalist, rode in the top-5 for most of the six lap race, battling reigning world champion Jolanda Neff of Switzerland for the final podium spots before fading slightly in the final lap. Annika Langvad of Denmark won the women’s race ahead of Pauline Ferrand Prevot of France. Other Canadian results include Canadian champion Emily Batty (Brooklin, ON) in 14th, Haley Smith (Uxbridge, ON) in 23rd, Cindy Montambault (Val-David, QC) in 34th and Rebecca Beaumont (Alma, QC) in 44th.

“I felt great,” said Pendrel, “just needed a little more dig in the last lap, but racing always helps train the brain and I look forward to fighting for the podium again at the next one.”

In the Elite men’s race, Leandre Bouchard (Alma, QC), who will represent Canada at the Commonwealth Games, was the top Canadian in 36th place. Sam Gaze of New Zealand outsprinted world champion Nino Schurter of Switzerland to take the victory. Other Canadian results include Canadian national champion Peter Disera (Horseshoe Valley, ON) in 45th, Andrew L’Esperance (Halifax, NS) in 57th and Raphael Gagne (Quebec City, QC) in 66th.

“I managed my race very well and had a clean ride,” said Bouchard. “I only did 2-3 minor mistakes. I just need a bit more power to be at the fitness level I’m looking for. It’s still early in the season so I’m looking forward to the next World Cups, and the Commonwealth Games.”

Canada also had four riders competing in the Under-23 men’s race, with Quinton Disera (Horseshoe Valley, ON) the top Canadian in 24th place, followed by Raphael Auclair (Haute-Saint-Charles, QC) in 40th, Felix Belhumeur (Montreal, QC) in 47th and Marc-Andre Fortier (Victoriaville, QC) in 51st.


Source: Cycling Canada

About Cycling Canada
Cycling Canada is the governing body for competitive cycling in Canada. Founded in 1882, Cycling Canada aims to create and sustain an effective system that develops talented Canadian cyclists to achieve Olympic, Paralympic, and World Championship medal performances. With the vision of being a leading competitive cycling nation by 2020 celebrating enhanced international success, increased national participation and world class event hosting, Cycling Canada manages the High Performance team, hosts national and international events and administers programs to promote and grow cycling across the country. Cycling Canada programs are made possible through the support of its valued corporate partners – Global Relay, Lexus Canada, Mattamy Homes, Louis Garneau and Bear Mountain Resort – along with the Government of Canada, Own The Podium, the Canadian Olympic Committee and the Canadian Paralympic Committee.

Jasmin Duehring Wins Bronze for Canada at Track World Championships

Team Canada finished off the 2018 UCI Track World Championships in Apeldoorn, Netherlands, on Sunday, March 4, 2018 with a bronze medal, with Jasmin Duehring of Vancouver finishing third in the women’s Points Race.

Duehring, who was seventh in the Scratch Race on the opening day of the Championships, came back from a disappointing Madison on Saturday to finish third behind Kirsten Wild of the Netherlands and Jennifer Valente of the United States. Duehring was one of nine riders to lap the field, as well as scoring points in three intermediate points during the race, to finish with 30 points in total.


Photo by Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist (All Rights Reserved) – Jasmin Duehring

“We’ve had a strong team here, but it hasn’t quite translated into medals, so I was really proud to have our Canadian flag go up once,” said Duehring. “I’ve been on the podium a few times in this event and the rainbow jersey has eluded me, so I really wanted to go for it. I raced aggressively and a couple of times tried to make a move to get a lap, but Kirsten Wild was so strong out there and she wasn’t letting anyone get away.”

Stefan Ritter was the only other Canadian athlete to race on Sunday, finishing 16th in the 1000 metre time trial with a time of one minute and 1.923 seconds. Ritter raced with a broken clavicle from an early crash. Jeffrey Hoogland of the Netherlands won the world title.

“It’s not the ride I was hoping for,” admitted Ritter, “I was definitely hoping for a top-10. But considering that I could not do a bunch of kilo prep and we didn’t practice many starts because of my shoulder, honestly, I’m pretty happy with 16th. I did feel on the standing starts; it’s painful but I can push through it and I’m pretty lucky that I can still ride and race.”

Jacques Landry, Chief Technical Officer – Head Coach at Cycling Canada, said “it’s not the best Track Worlds we’ve had, but certainly better than last year, when the men’s Team Pursuit squad crashed. Looking at the world championships as a whole, we have a lot of things to take home and work on. The men’s Team Pursuit rode really well and they are a lot more technically sound so we just have to do some fine-tuning. In the women’s Team Pursuit, we didn’t have all of our ‘A’ riders here and still managed to finish fourth, so next year in the Olympic qualification window we expect to be stronger as we’ll have more riders to choose from and who will feed off each other to get better.”

“On the sprint side, Amelia [Walsh] is continuing to progress and with Lauriane Genest moving up the ranks, we may be in the running for the Team Sprint in the future. For the men, Hugo [Barrette] needs to be able to deliver more than one or two good rides, so he needs to build his capacity. Stefan [Ritter] continues to learn and progress, and just needs more racing practice to avoid making mistakes. All in all, there are a lot of takeaways; we know what we have to do and we just have to execute. I think we are in a good situation; we may not have some of the rankings we are used to, but that is just a temporary situation and we’ll be able to get back on track for when it really counts.”


Source: Cycling Canada
About Cycling Canada
Cycling Canada is the governing body for competitive cycling in Canada. Founded in 1882, Cycling Canada aims to create and sustain an effective system that develops talented Canadian cyclists to achieve Olympic, Paralympic, and World Championship medal performances. With the vision of being a leading competitive cycling nation by 2020 celebrating enhanced international success, increased national participation and world class event hosting, Cycling Canada manages the High Performance team, hosts national and international events and administers programs to promote and grow cycling across the country. Cycling Canada programs are made possible through the support of its valued corporate partners – Global Relay, Lexus Canada, Mattamy Homes, Louis Garneau and Bear Mountain Resort – along with the Government of Canada, Own The Podium, the Canadian Olympic Committee and the Canadian Paralympic Committee.